Photography by Ben Jacobi: Blog en-us (C) Ben Jacobi (Photography by Ben Jacobi) Thu, 15 Mar 2018 15:49:00 GMT Thu, 15 Mar 2018 15:49:00 GMT Photography by Ben Jacobi: Blog 90 120 Pic of the Week 3/15/18: LP Supercell Crowell, TX Pic of the Week: 3/15/18

“LP Suprecell Crowell, TX”

Date taken: 3/18/12

Location: Highway 70 near Crowell, TX


With the spring equinox just around the corner, its this time of year that I start a transition in my photography. Now that winter is (mostly) finished the days start to get longer and the temperatures start to warm up. Spring time is an excellent time for any photography, but its my favorite time of the year—storm chase season! Although, if I'm being perfectly honest, the past several years have not been such good storm seasons for me. Commitments to work and other responsibilities keep me from chasing all that I want and now my vehicle is starting to get older and has been giving me problems since passing the 200,000 mile mark. So I expect that I won't travel too much this season. So here's hoping for some nice local chases.

For this weeks featured photo I looked back on some of my past chases and noticed a pretty disturbing trend. After 2012 I haven't had a storm photo worth sharing during the month of March. March 15th marks the first “offical” day of the chase season, but for the past six years I have not captured a useable storm photo in March. I remember when I first started storm chasing and would be out as early as the first week of February. Maybe I'm just used to earlier setups, or maybe this is how it normally is. Regardless, my last sucessful March intercept was all the way back in 2012. And it was an interesting chase day.

I had driven out to Childress, TX in the early afternoon. After carefully going over surface charts, satellite/radar images, and weather models I decided on my target. Sitting at a gas station in the middle of town I could see puffy cotton-ball like cumulus clouds developing overhead and a warm southeasterly gust would blow through now and then. Within a few hours I was making my way to the west side of town and following a rapidly accelerating tower. “This storm might bust through the cap” I thought to myself. As I scanned the horizon I could also see more towers going up along the dryline stretching from west to southwest of my location. I felt pretty good about my target and when the storm broke through the cap and started to explode. I was in a good position keeping an eye on the storms updraft. I followed and chased the storm for a few hours before it took off to the northeast and blew itself out.

The storm, while beautiful, never really seemed to get going and I was so entranced with my storm that I failed to notice the beast of a cell forming to my south/southwest. I looked over on the radar and saw a classic hook echo and “screaming eagle” shape to the storm. “I bet it goes tor-...” I was cut off in my thinking when a warning alarm came in over my radio and a bright pink polygon appeared around the storm. The storm was now tornado warned and I was on 35 miles away. I finally gave up on my storm and started making my way south keeping track of the storm on radar along the way. About 20 miles from the storm, I could start to make out the updraft base. It was a thick barrel shape with a low blocky wall cloud protruding from the base. I was too far away to see any rotation so I wanted to get closer to investigate.

About 10 miles away from the storm I was able to take in its photogenic structure in the late afternoon light. A strip of golden yellow light was hovering above the horizon behind the dark and foreboding storm clouds. I watched this storm move off to my north east, but as it did so I noticed it starting to dry up. The thick barrel shaped updraft began to shrivel and shrink into a skinnier fluffier structure, and the low blocky wall cloud dissipated up. The updraft base started to become more elevated as the sun began to set. The storm had transitioned from a healthy, classic supercell to a low precipitation supercell. I decided to pull over and watch the storm go off into the sunset. I found a big open field where stopped and got my camera out. To try and add some foreground interest I incorporated the stalks of some weeds and framed the storm's updraft between them to make a somewhat interesting composition.

I sat on the hood of my car watching the storm try one last push of the updraft before finally succumbing to the lack of energy and moisture. The scene was quite nice and there was nobody else around which made it even more special. The storm eventually starved and died out and I turned back to the east and headed back to Wichita Falls. So while it wasn't the most exciting chase, it was still a chase in March. I'm hoping for a great storm season, but I'm remaining realistic in my optimism. Only time will tell. Once thing is for sure, the month of March isn't over yet.


LP Supercell Crowell, TXLP Supercell Crowell, TX © Ben Jacobi

]]> (Photography by Ben Jacobi) Thu, 15 Mar 2018 16:00:00 GMT
Pic of the Week 3/9/18: Sunset on the Bluffs Pic of the Week 3/9/18

“Sunset on the Bluffs”

Location: Wichita Falls, TX

Date Taken: 3/8/18


Truthfully, I had not planned to post a Pic of the Week this week. I really hate that, I don’t like having anything new to share or any stories to tell. Sometimes I’m just lazy, other times I’m busy, but this time was different. I actually had a legitimate excuse. Since Sunday morning I have been sick with whatever cold that is going around. I woke up with a sore throat and discovered that my voice was all but gone. It stayed that way until yesterday (Wednesday) evening when my voice finally started to come back. I was excited to speak again and I was more excited that I was doing better. I had made an appointment to see the doctor Thursday morning and I even considered cancelling it. Around 2:30am I was awoken by a huge gasp of air I tried to take in. I had fallen asleep on my side and one my nostrils was stopped up and the other was covered by my pillow—I couldn’t breathe! I don’t mind having a sore throat and I don’t mind that I lost my voice, but I cannot stand being congested!!! If I can’t breathe well I feel like all my energy is being zapped from me. Simple tasks become so much harder when you are only breathing through one of your sinuses. So that night I tossed and turned and hardly got any rest and I knew I was going to keep my appointment tomorrow morning.

I woke up early and went to the clinic and got checked out. The doctor informed me that I had caught whatever it was that was going around. She wrote me a couple of prescriptions and I was on my way. As the day drew on I became more and more congested and stopped up, but now there was sinus pressure building in my ears and head. This is the stuff I really, REALLY, hate and it puts me in a sour mood quite frankly. Now I know what you’re thinking, “Why are you telling us this?” mostly its to let you know I have a good excuse for the delayed Pic of the Week. “So, what about the photography?” I assume you’re thinking. I’ll go ahead and get on with that. While I am sick, I still went in to work today, in fact I’ve been in everyday this week (its not fun to help customers with no voice). But today, I had a shoot to do and I brought my camera. So, as I’m getting ready to leave from work I look outside and I see the sky. There are some broken lines of alto-cumulus clouds and a small strip of clear sky near the horizon. I wondered if there might be a decent sunset. I got into my car and considered driving out to the Wichita Bluffs Nature Area and see if I could catch a sunset over some of the bluffs. So instead of driving home and curling up in my bed I decided to drive to the Wichita Bluffs. Along the way my head was pounding, I was coughing, and my nose was running EEEWWWW! But I kept looking at my rearview mirror watching the sky. Just a few miles down the road and I was the entrance to the Wichita Bluffs Nature Area.

Now I have visited the bluffs once before on a short walk. I was impressed with the trail and even the way they tried to preserve the natural landscape. Its nice having these little escapes into nature close to home. I got my camera and my tripod together and began to walk on the trail. Now, the sun was starting to get closer to the horizon and I knew the location I wanted to be. But as I said earlier, when you can’t breathe even simple things can be difficult. I continued on the path with the pressure in my head increasing. With each step I would hear a small pop like I was taking off in a commercial airliner. I looked behind me and saw the sky was showing more promise and I continued on the trail. There was a point where my legs were just too tired, my breath was too shallow, and the sun was getting too low. So, I opted for the first side trail I could find. From this view I could see the bluff I actually wanted to be at, but I also noticed that there were some compositions right where I was. I set up my camera pointing towards the bluff and watched the clouds float across the sky. I noticed something when I was shooting some of the photos, I could breathe—through both nostrils!

I was ecstatic. No amount of medicine would take away or alleviate my symptoms, but you get me behind the camera and into some nature and all those distractions just melted away. I knew this was only going to be temporary euphoria, but I was going to hold on to every bit of it. During my spirited state, I found a nice composition of some native grass, the jungle of mesquite trees in the valley, and the bluff I was using as my subject. I played around with some angles and focal lengths and found the one I liked most. Not but a few seconds later, the sun fell below the clouds and sent a soft warm glow of light on the bluffs and the grass in my foreground. A small strip of pink color creeped in on the left side of the sky helping to unify the warm and cool color tones. There is a tranquil feel and a subtle beauty to this image that I feel reflects the Wichita Bluffs Nature Area quite well. This isn’t a super dramatic landscape or vista, but there’s a simple, subtle beauty to the scene. The foreground grass contrasts nicely against the dark wood of the mesquite and cottonwood trees in the background. Even the light itself is delicately falling on the landscape bringing about a subdued beauty to the scene. I stayed in that spot until just after sunset and began the walk back to my car. The adrenaline and excitement from the photography started to wear off and I could feel my symptoms returning. But I was happy that I came back with a nice image and actually got to breathe for a short time. If you live in Wichita Falls and you haven’t checked out the Wichita Bluffs Nature Area I highly recommend you visit. The trail is a one mile one way walk on a paved path that leads on top of the bluffs and to an overlook of the Wichita River. I’ll try to be on schedule with my Pic of the Week next week, hopefully I’ll be back to my normal self by then. Enjoy!




Sunset on the BluffsSunset on the BluffsTranquil sunset overlooking the bluffs at the Wichita Bluff Nature Area © Ben Jacobi

]]> (Photography by Ben Jacobi) bluffs grass landscape mesas nature pic of the week rock sky texas trees wichita bluffs nature area wichita falls Fri, 09 Mar 2018 17:00:00 GMT
Pic of the Week 3/1/18: Spider Split Pic of the Week 3/1/18
"Spider Split"
Location: Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge
Date taken: 2/25/18

I really enjoy hiking. I like getting outside and experiencing nature first hand. While I almost always hike with camera, photography is not the main goal. But during the hike I like to take note of locations and potential photographs in the area. Then I will return under better shooting conditions. Sometimes this means hiking for long distances, sometimes it means I might need traverse a high ridge or mountain, and sometimes it means I need to return to the location again and again to get it right. Spider Split was one of those times. I had searched for Spider Split a couple of times before. The first time I went all around Bat Cave Peak looking for the fissure and after a couple of hours I gave up and returned back to my vehicle. The second time I took a friend and fellow photographer (Chris Martin) out with me and tried to find it together, but with no luck. Thankfully however, we ran into some hikers (thanks Kim and Michelle) who were able to show us the entrance to split. I was amazed at how close I was the first time. It just proves that you need to know where you're going to find it. It can easily be overlooked and passed right by--believe me I've done it, twice! I am happy to report that this past weekend I had no problems finding the entrance. Third times a charm I guess...

This time my good friend and fellow photographer Elizabeth Hawley came along. She had never been to this part of the refuge before. I am always excited when I get to introduce people to Charon Gardens and see their faces light up when looking on the massive boulders, tall cliffs, and unusual rock formations. It reminds me of how I first felt when I experienced the area and realized there was more to the Wichita Mountains than Mt Scott and Quanah Parker Lake. We left Wichita Falls around 6:00am and started off towards the refuge. Along the way we passed through blankets of thick fog near the Red River. It was a fairly chilly morning as a cold front had moved through the area earlier in the week. The temperature was just around 30 degrees and the dewpoint was near 30 as well. The wind was calm and the sky was clear. As we drove on the interstate the fog gave way and I could start to see the mountains in the distance, but the grass on the side of the road was covered in a light frost making the dew sparkle like diamonds in the early morning light. This had me concerned, with the recent rain the rocks were likely saturated and frozen by the cold temperatures, but we pressed on. We reached the refuge and after a quick stop near the prairie dog town to photograph Mt Lincoln in the warm sunlight, we continued on towards the Exfoliation Dome parking area and Bat Cave Mountain. It was now a little after sunrise and we gathered our gear and started off in the westward direction towards Monolith boulder. I have been to this area before and its very easy to get to. In fact you can see the boulder from the parking area. 

We began the steep climb up the smooth granite slab and followed along the rocky ridge. We could see a small arch to our south known as the "Window of the Wichitas" while photogenic from this angle we did not have time to deviate from our route if we wanted to reach Spider Split in time. We crossed a few streams and wet rocks and I took a small slip on the slick granite but returned to my feet unscathed. We continued our westerly heading passing through rock and brush and eventually came toe to toe with Monolith Boulder. We had a short break at the boulder and took in the wonderful vista before us. If you really want to experience the Wichita Mountains than you need to get higher. From the boulder we could see the smaller Lobo (French) mountain, Mt Scott, Mt Wall, Quetone Point, Mt Roosevelt, Mt Sheridan, and Mt Marcy to our east and north east. To our immediate north we could see Mt Lincoln and the eastern face of Elk Mountain. After the short break we continued up towards blocky summit of Bat Cave Peak and after some minor bushwhacking we made it to the entrance to Spider Split. The entrance doesn't look like it goes anywhere, but after entering and turning to the left the fissure opens up and you're tucked between twenty foot tall granite walls. We walked through the split taking a quick peek through a small archway in the rock and exploring the area before we set up our shots.

 I knew what shot I wanted to capture and what composition I wanted to use. I decided for a vertical orientation to accentuate the height of the granite walls and use the sky and surrounding rock walls to frame my subject. The composition is from a very low perspective making the rock spires appear to tower over your head. We sat in the split waiting for the light to become just right and after an hour the sun reached a point where golden light spilled into the fissure igniting some of the walls in a glow that resembled hot embers from a fire. The light reflected and bounced off the cliffs giving us nice reflected light on the rocks. 


Spider Split

© Ben Jacobi

After the fantastic reflected light dissipated we were still not done yet. The sun made an appearance through one of the cracks and sent a small shaft of light through the split. This reminded me of a smaller version of Antelope Canyon and getting to photograph it was a real treat. We finished up in Spider Split and made our way back to our vehicles. We would continue to explore more of the Charon Gardens and also made it Post Oak and Little Post Oak Falls. The recent rains kept all the creeks alive and flowing with fresh rain water down the mountains and cliffs. We ended up spending a little over four and a half hours exploring and shooting the area before heading to nearby Medicine Park for a well earned lunch. I was very grateful to share one my favorite places of the Wichita Mountains with an excellent photographer and a great friend.

]]> (Photography by Ben Jacobi) bat cave peak cliff granite landscape mountains nature oklahoma pic of the week rock spider split travel wichita mountains wichita mountains wildlife refuge Thu, 01 Mar 2018 17:15:00 GMT
Pic of the Week 2/22/18: Ancient Cedar Pic of the Week 2/22/18

“Ancient Cedar”

Location: Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge, OK

Date taken: 2/18/18

I photographed this magnificent old tree on my recent hike in the Wichita Mountains. When I go hiking I always take my camera just in case I find something worth shooting, but when I’m hiking my goal is not photography—at least not my main goal. My main goal is to scout potential locations and look for interesting scenes that could be photographed under more photogenic conditions. So, while I have been taking my camera on these hikes, I haven’t really pulled it out much. But this hike was going to be different. I had planned a more ambitious hike; a hike in the backcountry. If you have followed me for a while you know I enjoy spending time in the Charon Gardens Wilderness Area of the Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge. It is so isolated and generally untouched by human hands that you really are in a wilderness. While I have been through some areas of the Charon Gardens, there is so much I have not explored and a lot of these places require off trail hiking. I am not that experienced in off trail hiking as I generally hike alone and I try to stay in areas people travel. However, I have been getting more and more into off trail hiking and bushwhacking, but nothing with the length and intensity of this planned hike.

I had spent a good few weeks planning out my route for this hike studying topographic maps and using Google Earth for locating key waypoints and landmarks. The original plan was to start near the western boundary of the park by the Indiahoma Rd gate entrance. I was going to try to reach the Badlands, the big quartz crystal, the Big Cedar, Spanish Cave, and Ison’s canyon. The 6.5 mile loop would take me through the heart of the Charon Gardens Wilderness Area. I knew for a fact I wanted to make it to the big quartz crystal and the Big Cedar, but I wasn’t sure if I had the stamina to reach Spanish Cave and Ison’s canyon. So, to make a long story short, I did reach the big quartz crystal and the Big Cedar, but after backtracking, climbing over and squeezing my way through massive boulders I decided to try Spanish Cave and Ison’s Canyon another day. I will say that I was not disappointed in this decision, because I did reach the goal I had set out for and that was to photograph the majestic Big Cedar.

I first caught a glimpse of the Big Cedar from a local hiking group on Facebook. I saw images of people standing next to this massive, gnarled cedar tree what they appropriately titled “The Big Cedar”. It had caught my attention and I knew I wanted to photograph and document it. Thanks to the help of one of the members, I was able to see a map with the exact location of the cedar. Now that I knew where to find it I could plan my route. And after a few weeks of research I had the hike planned. Things don’t always go as we hope though. For instance, my good friend Kyle was going to join me, but got sick the day before. Not only that, but when I drove out to the refuge that morning the entire area was covered under dense fog. I knew I couldn’t find my way if I couldn’t see and identify the mountains and landmarks on my route. But something inside of me kept urging me to press on and as I drove over the cattle guards and entered the refuge I made a promise to myself. The promise was if I could see Granite mountain, Charon Gardens Mountain, and Mount Mitchell from the parking lot than I would go ahead with the hike. I pulled up to the Indiahoma Rd gate and sure enough I could see the tall peak of Granite mountain directly in front of me. Off to the north I could see the distant peak of Mt Mitchell and to the west Charon Gardens Mountain and I knew I could reach my destination—provided it didn’t start raining. Thankfully the rain never came and I was able to reach the big quartz crystal and the Big Cedar. But reaching the cedar was no easy task. Once I got to a waypoint where I would begin my climb I could see near vertical cliffs of Twin Rocks Mountain and the steep ascent I would need to make. Towards the top I could make out my marker rock and just to the right of it was a crevice, that was my entrance to the Big Cedar hike. When I reached the crevice, I found I had to do a little bit of scrambling and climbing over smooth granite boulders to get access. After some determination and careful foot placement I had made it through the crevice and as I came over the top of the rocks I could see the top of the Big Cedar.

Honestly, it didn’t impress me that much it looked much smaller from where I was. But as I made the tricky descent to the base of cedar the actual size of this monster became apparent. I placed my hand on the trunk of this old cedar tree and it was instantly dwarfed by the size, texture, and depth of the bark. I read on the facebook group that they measured the trunk to be thirteen feet in circumference and saw images where it took three people to wrap their arms around the entire base. It is a very large tree. Photographing it was going to be a challenge and I knew I wouldn’t be coming back anytime soon to the tree so I needed to get some shots of it. Due to the overcast conditions and texture of the tree I wanted to shoot for a black and white image. I carefully scanned up and down the tree marveling at its unique shape and patterns and found a tight composition that would work for a black and white image. I was mesmerized by this one branch (?) that seemed to coil and curve like a snake slithering up the tree. The curvature of the branch interrupting the straight vertical lines of the trunk created a lot of tension in the scene, but at the same time the delicate placement of the curves and moss resting on the bark made it also look tranquil. It was balanced in perfect harmony.

Ancient CedarAncient Cedar

© Ben Jacobi

 This image is not my typical style, but the subject was not my typical subject and I feel it needed a unique perspective for a tree with such character. I almost approached it more like I would a portrait. What story did this tree want to tell me? What wisdom was locked away in those knots and twists in the bark? There’s no telling what things this tree has seen, the storms it has weathered, the droughts faced, and yet, here it is still standing hidden away in its own oasis resting in the canyon on a mountain. Seldom seeing any visitors, but to those that are willing enough to reach the ancient cedar, perhaps they can find peace and renewal in the experience. Its these isolated areas and relatively unknown places that I’m drawn to. Throughout my hike in the Charon Gardens I did not see another person. All I saw was the flora and fauna of the wilderness and that was good enough company for me.

]]> (Photography by Ben Jacobi) Thu, 22 Feb 2018 17:00:00 GMT
Pic of the Week 2/15/18: King Mountain Pic of the Week 2/15/18

"King Mountain"

Location: Quartz Mountain State Park, OK

Date taken: 2/13/16


Well, I wish I had a new Pic of the Week to share with y'all, but unfortunately I have had to postpone a camping trip I planned for three weeks now. The weather has just not been favorable. So I am going back a few years during much more photogenic conditions. It was a typical mid February afternoon and I had spent a good portion of it driving up to Quartz Mountain State Park in Oklahoma. I had arrived just in time to do some scouting and explore some compositions. As the day drew on sunset became imminent and I needed to be ready for it. I had decided earlier I would be shooting the sunset at the beach towards the southern end of Lake Altus-Lugert. My hope was high level clouds would enter the scene and soak up all the brilliant sunset color. I walked along the sandy shores of the beach looking for potential photos.

As I gazed across the lake I would see King Mountain towering over the surrounding prairie. At 2,411ft (elev) King Mountain is only the sixth tallest peak in the Wichita Mountains range, but its 800ft prominence from the lake made it the most dominant feature of the landscape. That would be my subject. While out exploring, I found a rocky shoreline that I thought could make an interesting composition. I watched as the waves of Lake Altus-Lugert came over the rocks and splashed against the shore, sending hundreds of droplets airborne that sparkled like diamonds in the late afternoon sun. Its hard to believe that even just a few years ago (2014) the lake was at a critical level due to the persistent drought. From 19% to 95% in a matter of a few months, the rain was a godsend not just for necessity, but aesthetic quality too.

I had lined up my shot and thought it would benefit from a longer exposure. This also gave me an opportunity to try out my newly acquired Lee Big Stopper 10-stop neutral density filter. The sun sank lower behind Quartz mountain and the sky started to light up with hues of pinks and golds. I did a quick check on my focus and set my camera to bulb exposure. This meant I was responsible for how long the shutter would stay open. I attached the filter and attached my cable release as to not disturb the camera during the long exposure. I pressed down the cable release and began counting in my head. After 125 seconds I closed the shutter. I anxiously checked the image on the LCD. I knew if I didn't get the exposure or the timing right I wouldn't be able to redo the shot. The light on the clouds was changing so quickly I wouldn't have time to make another two minute exposure.

When I looked at the image on the LCD I was quite satisfied. Basically, everything I had envisioned for the shot came to be. The rocks in the foreground were framed in a way to mimic the shape of the mountains and the long exposure turned the water to an almost glass-like appearance.  Above the horizon the high altitude winds were bringing the clouds farther north and the long exposure smeared the clouds into a wonderful cohesion of pastel colors. Andthere near the center frame was the monumental King Mountain looming over the lake. Soft golden light had reflected of the north face revealing even the smallest of details on the rocky peak.

I really love the contrast of the hard and soft areas of the image. My eye tends to start towards the bottom following the natural leading line of the rocks that melt into the perfect softness of Lake Altus-Lugert. As they continue upward they are confronted with the rocky face of King Mountain, then rest gently into the softness of the colorful clouds above the peak. This was one of my favorite captures from the trip and after this shot was taken I started to pack up, but then the post sunset sky exploded into bright reds and purples in the sky. What a way to end an already perfect sunset.


King Mountain: Altus, OKKing Mountain: Altus, OK © Ben Jacobi

]]> (Photography by Ben Jacobi) king mountain landscape mountain nature oklahoma pic of the week quartz mountain state park sky travel wichita mountains Thu, 15 Feb 2018 17:58:08 GMT
Pic of the Week 1/25/18: Caddo Maple Pic of the Week 1/25/18
"Caddo Maple"
Location: Red Rock Canyon State Park, Hinton, OK
Date taken: 1/21/18

I returned from my first overnight camping/photography trip of 2018. The destination was a small state park in central Oklahoma. It is a park that I have been wanting to visit for quite some time, but could never get it to work with my schedule. I am talking of Red Rock Canyon State Park. Not to be confused with Red Rock Canyon State Park in CA and NV, but the state park in central Oklahoma. While the park is small, its is no less impressive. The park is nestled in a one mile long canyon surrounded by stunning red rock cliffs. Many people go there to ride motorcycles, camp and hike, and rappell down the cliff walls. But before it was a park the Native Americans would use the canyon as a winter shelter. The canyon was also an important landmark of the California Trail and for those seeking wealth and prosperity during the California gold rush. In fact, in the park there are areas you can see wagon ruts carved through the red rock. I was there to camp, hike, and of course shoot some photography. The unseasonably warm temperatures beckoned me to get outside and explore with my camera. 

I left work Saturday afternoon around 2pm and headed north towards Oklahoma. There is no one single road that takes you to the park. Throughout the drive I would change highways, and zigzag on different roads as I drove through the open prairie. The drive was fairly short and only took a couple of hours, but when I started to get closer to Hinton, OK I started to notice a little bit of a change in the landscape. Eventually, I reached the entrance to Red Rock Canyon State Park and made the steep, winding descent into the canyon. At first look I could see the red rock walls the park was named after. They rivaled and in cases exceeded the red rock of Palo Duro Canyon and southern, UT. It was hard to believe I was still in Oklahoma. The park road lies at the floor of the canyon and follows it for a little less than a mile to the end of the canyon. I pulled into the Canyon camping area and found a nice spot beside some of the Red Rock. I got my camp set up and went to explore the park before sunset. It was starting to get late and I knew I only had about a half hour before the sunset so I went to a balance rock near the entrance to photograph it in sunset light. These images came out alright, but what I was really looking forward to was the next day. I was wanting to capture the sunrise light reflecting off the canyon walls. 

After the sunset shoot I walked back to my campsite and started to plan out the next morning. My goal was to photograph some of the sunrise and then hit the trail early. I had a 6 mile hike planned that would take me throughout the California Road trail, then connect me with the Canyon Rim trail where I would descend the canyon and continue to the Rough Horsetail trail and then back to my vehicle. All together I ended up hiking 6.3 miles through the morning. I was the only one out on the trails and I had it all to myself, which I thorough enjoyed. But before I started hiking I woke up at 7:30am and got my gear together to see what kind of images I could make that morning. The sky had clouded up and I could see a few breaks in the cloud cover, but I was not too optimistic about my sunrise chances. I was one of the few people up this early and was undisturbed while I looked for potential photographs as I drove to the trailhead. I cam across a section of the canyon with an interesting overhang in the rock as I explored this area I found a lone Caddo Maple sapling with its leaves still attached. This caught my eye and I decided I would shoot the sunrise at this location. 

This type of photography is not normally something that I do, usually I try to go for a wide angle to incorporate the whole scene, but there are times where I deviate from my comfort zone and start isolating scenes and looking at smaller details. The almost brown leaves stood out just enough against the red canyon wall and I thought if I could find the right angle I might have a shot here. I played around with different focal lengths, but this was the one I found most striking. The pattern of the canyon wall would reflect the sunrise light in a unique way and if I zoomed in you could not tell where the photo was taken. You can't tell how tall these rock cliffs are, in fact it almost looks like something you might capture in Zion National Park! It just goes to show if you can focus in on more isolated areas you can find unique photographs. I had my camera set up and now it was time to just wait for the light but the lingering clouds left me a little worried. There was a brief period where the sun broke through and sunrise light splashed against the ciffs turning them to an almost glowing state. But as the sun came out the wind also picked up and my shutter speed was too slow to stop the motion of the leaves blowing in the wind. I decided to use my camera's built in timer release to shoot off multiple frames and maybe, just maybe, the wind would die down during one of those times. I photographed about 15 images before the could swallowed up all the sunlight and I packed up my gear. As I looked on my camera's LCD I was saddened by the lack of sharpness on all the photos until I got the second to last image. This photo was sharp! And not only that it was during the peak of the light reflecting off the canyon walls! Even the little lone leaf towards the top was sharp! I came back with a winner of a style I don't typically shoot, in an area I had never visited, during less than ideal conditions. Now that's a win in my book! 


UntitledFleeting Caddo MapleRed Rock Canyon State Park makes the perfect environment and shelter for Caddo Maple trees. This sapling clings to its last remaining leaves in front of the stunning red rock.

© Ben Jacobi

]]> (Photography by Ben Jacobi) caddo maple canyon maple nature oklahoma pic of the week red rock canyon red rock canyon state park rock rock wall travel Thu, 25 Jan 2018 18:47:06 GMT
Pic of the Week 1/18/18: Red River Aerial Pic of the Week 1/18/18
"Red River"
Location: Red River on the TX/OK border
Date taken: 1/26/14

    I love photography and I really love meeting other passionate photographers. We photographers can get together and "talk shop" for hours on end. One of the better things about meeting and connecting with other photographers is the chance for networking. Through my job I have met some really great people and photographers and I have made some incredible friendships along the way. One of those connections brought a unique opportunity to me, my friend and fellow photographer Elizabeth invited me to shoot some aerial photos. For those of you who don't know I have a fear of heights, so you would understand my hesitation and confusion by the offer. But, I thought about what kind of interesting photos I could capture from a higher perspective and the fear was replaced with curiosity and wonderment. We set a date and I decided on a subject to photograph--the Red River. The Red River is 1,360 miles long and starts in the Texas panhandle and flows southeast to Louisiana and eventually meets with the Atchafalaya River, and then flows into the Gulf of Mexico. The Red River also serves as the boundary between Texas and Oklahoma. I thought a shot of the sun rising over the red would make for a nice scene and that's what I decided on.

    I awoke to the sound of my alarm going off. I got up and checked the weather data hoping for clear skies and no wind. After browsing through the data and grabbing a quick breakfast I was off to the airport to meet with Elizabeth and my pilot Gary. I arrived to the airport and found Gary and Elizabeth going over the pre-flight checklist. It was a brisk morning and brought enough layers to handle the cold and the wind. While they were doing the inspection, I was going through my bag deciding how I wanted to shoot the images. I settled on using my 24-85mm lens on my Nikon D700. This would give me a wide enough range to photograph wide field and maybe some up close aerial photos. The time came where we were ready for take off and I hopped into the co-pilots seat. Elizabeth gave me some instruction on how to use the headset to communicate with Gary and we were going through the takeoff checklist. After the checklist Gary started the engine up. We heard it sputter and then nothing. Gary tried again, but to no avail. It was decided (by the pilots, not by myself) that the battery needed to be charged more. And I sat and watched as they loaded the chopper on the trailer and drove it to the hangar. 

Behind me the sun was just starting to greet the chilly Sunday morning and the sky began to take on the familiar red/pink hues of an early morning winter. Thin cirrus clouds whispped through the morning sky soaking up the brilliant colors. I was a little disheartened that I wasn't over the river shooting the sunrise, but I did snap a few images from the ground level view. After about a half hour they were ready to try starting the engine again. This time the engine came on and after the checklist we were ready to get airborne. As we lifted off I watched as the airport got smaller and farther away and with the gain of altitude I could really see just how flat our area is. Way off in the distance I could see the peaks of the Wichita Mountains some 60miles away. The sun was just now rising above the cirrus clouds and I was ready to start shooting. It was a short 10 minute flight to the river, but along the way we landed so Gary could remove my door. Now I had the freedom to shoot anything out my window. 

We spent the next few hours flying around the Red River and photographing various scenes of the landscape down below. This was back in 2014 and still in the height of the drought so the river was low and sandbars down below made for interesting compositions. There was one area that I seemed to think would work well for a shot. I got on the headset and let Gary know where I wanted to be asked him to fly a little bit lower. As we moved over the scene the roar of our engine startled the wildlife down below causing a flock of ducks to scatter and fly over the river. This encouraged a Great Blue heron to relocate, as well. When the birds started flying I began pressing the shutter tracking them through my camera and silently praying these shots would be in focus. The final image that I chose featured the birds mid flight over the river and the white feather of their wings contrasted nicely against the darker river. The heron's bright blue plumage stood out well against the red and rust color of the sand. I came back with some cool shots that day, but this was one of my favorites. The birds add a little extra depth, energy, and scale to the photo making easy to determine how high up we really were. I haven't done any more aerial photography since then, maybe I will need to do some this year. 


Red RiverRed River Aerial © Ben Jacobi

]]> (Photography by Ben Jacobi) aerial birds flying landscape nature pic of the week red river river sand texas water Thu, 18 Jan 2018 17:36:54 GMT
Pic of the Week 1/11/18: Highway 160 Panorama © Ben Jacobi


Where am I going? What adventures lie ahead? What setbacks will I experience? How will my photography career grow? Did I forget to lock my front door this morning? These are questions I ask myself this time of year. I usually slow down in January and it gives me time to reminisce and plan for future photo shoots. So where do you think I should go in 2018? Leave a comment below and let me know what areas you think I should visit. I'm looking forward to see what 2018 has for me and my photography. 



]]> (Photography by Ben Jacobi) Thu, 11 Jan 2018 16:45:00 GMT
2017 Timelapse Video Well here we are we made it to the new year! 2018 I'm very excited to see what you have in store for me. 2017 was an excellent year for my photography. I got to travel a lot more than usual and captured some truly awe-inspiring scenes. I can't think of a better way to say goodbye to 2017 than by releasing my 2017 Timelapse Video. It took the whole year to shoot, edit, and render this timelapse project and I am so happy with how it turned out. Despite having a mediocre storm season I was able to come back with beautiful timelapse sequences of stunning landscapes and breath-taking night skies. I traveled to New York, Oklahoma, New Mexico, Colorado, and around Texas in 2017. I captured a little under 22,000 images to make up this final video and I'm very excited for you to see it. Be sure you watch it in 4k to get the full experience. Enjoy and bring on 2018!


2017 Timelapse Video (4k) from BDJPhoto on Vimeo.







]]> (Photography by Ben Jacobi) 2017 colorado landscape mexico mountains nature new night oklahoma texas timelapse travel york Thu, 04 Jan 2018 17:45:00 GMT
Pic of the Week 12/21/17: 2017 Geminids Meteor Shower Pic of the Week 12/21/17

“2017 Geminids Meteor Shower”

Date taken: 12/15/17

Location: Great Plains State Park/Tom Steed Reservoir, OK


It has been two years since I last photographed the Geminids meteor shower and after the less than average Perseids shower in August, I was once again ready for hunting more meteors. This year was going to be great year for the shower. We were forecast to have clear skies and a crescent moon that would only break the horizon after 4am. The best time for the shower would be when the radiant was highest in the sky around 1am that night. This gave us over three hours of shooting and counting meteors. After the first two hours, I lost count at 250. The show was quite impressive. I was excited for the shower, but I knew I had work the next day so I needed to find a location that was under a 2-hour drive. I could have gone with my usual west TX dark skies such as Caprock Canyon or Copper Breaks, but I wanted to try a new location I hadn’t shot before. After some research, I settled on Great Plains State Park in southern Oklahoma. The main reason I did this was the park access is open 24/7 and it has relatively low light pollution. I spent a few days looking over the area on Google Earth and gathering information about the location.

I had invited a few of my photographer friends to join me, but the only one that was able to make it was Jaden Corbin. We left Wichita Falls around 9:30pm that night and started off towards Oklahoma. Along the way we spotted a few meteors zipping across the dark skies. We reached the park entrance and looked around for a little bit. I had an idea to photograph the meteor shower over the lake, but the light pollution across the lake was too strong to get any usable shots. I had been to Great Plains State Park before (though not at night time) and remembered a small overlook of some the mountains and Snyder Lake on the west end of the park. This would be my backup if the lake photos would not work out. We drove to the overlook and parked our car and stared at the starry night sky above. The constellation Orion was hovering over the mountains and shone in all its glory. You could make out the belt, arms, and bow of the great hunter. Behind us the milky way was dropping below the western horizon as Cassiopeia, Ursa Major, and Ursa Minor sparkled above. We set up our tripods and cameras and shot photos from this location for almost three hours. During this time, we watched as the skies became littered with streaking meteors radiating from Gemini and spreading all around us. We would be talking about a particular subject and be interrupted by the other person calling out the meteor count. While the skies were clear there were some thick clouds way off in the south and west and wind picked up after midnight. The air coming off the lake was frigid and I would jump in place trying to stay warm. The thought that I could be home and snuggled up in my warm bed seemed to overcome my desire to be outside in the cold air, but then a green flash would appear and a meteor would stretch through the scene and ignite the sky and my desire to photograph again.

 At the end of the I sat in my car warming up by the heater and looking over some of the photos. I had seen a few decent ones, but once I got home and looked at them on my computer screen I was ecstatic at the number of meteors I captured. Like usual, I opted for a time-stack composite image where I take all the meteors I captured and add them into a single frame. This method lets me show the entire event in just one image. Some people have their reservations on whether this is “true” photography. Personally, I think it’s the only way I can convey what we experienced and I hope it inspires people to get out and watch it themselves.

 It took a total of 55 images to create the final version and there are 53 meteors visible in the photo. I did take some “creative license” in the placement, but that was mostly to avoid intersecting meteors and help the image flow. Interestingly, I decided to use an exposure with the car lights on for the foreground. This was not my original intent or idea when I planned this composite, but I think it adds a little more depth and perspective. The reflected light also helps bring out the mountains and lake in the background. I am glad I got to photograph this meteor shower and I’m very glad the weather cooperated with us and we ended up with some nice images.

Enjoy and have a Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays!


© Ben Jacobi

]]> (Photography by Ben Jacobi) geminids great plains state park meteor meteor shower meteors mountains nature night oklahoma pic of the week sky travel wichita mountains Thu, 21 Dec 2017 17:30:00 GMT
Pic of the Week 12/7/17: Great Sand Dunes National Park: Tall Dune                 Oh my, it has been over a month since my last update. I apologize for the delay. But I haven’t just been sitting around doing nothing. I have been busy with work, my calendar sales, and I’ve been working on my 2017 Timelapse project (which I hope to release towards the end of the year). Truthfully, I lapsed one week and fell out of the schedule, but I am back again and posting. I have a lot of new photos to share with everyone and I’m very excited to y’all to see them. With that said, lets get to this week’s Pic of the Week.


Pic of the Week 12/7/17

“Great Sand Dunes National Park: Tall Dune”

Location: Great Sand Dunes National Park, CO

Date taken: 9/23/17


                When it comes to sand dunes I have a love/hate relationship. There are certainly reasons to enjoy and experience these mysterious natural areas. They’re usually very photogenic and take on interesting patterns and shapes that beckon to be photographed. Sand can be quite beautiful especially during the early morning and late evening hours when the sand reflects all the sun’s light coloring them in wonderful hues of reds, oranges, and golds. But sand can also be quite difficult. Its very rough on the camera equipment, and it tends to get everywhere. It can easily ruin cameras, lenses, flashes, tripods, etc. It can also be hard to hike or trek on. You have to work much harder to get anywhere in sand. And don’t even get me started on the wind. Wind can turn a sand dune into a sand blaster and its not fun when you’re climbing up a dune and sand is being blasted in your eyes. So why go out to places like this? Well, I guess the only answer I can come up with is “to try and conquer it”.

                When I planned this trip, I knew we were going to visit Great Sand Dunes National Park and there was no doubt in my mind we would be getting in some sand. I thought I would offer up the chance to climb the Tall Dune in the park maybe as something we could do if we had the time. But when I brought it to Ian and Jaden they were both willing to try it. The Tall Dune in GSDNP towers 699ft over the basin and is a highly trafficked area. There are no trails. You reach the parking lot and start hiking towards the large dune crest immediately to your west. To reach the top of the dune you need to crisscross over ridges like delicate switchbacks and since there is no trail sometimes you have to backtrack and find the correct path.

                Now I know it sounds like all I’m doing is complaining, and while that is true it is well worth the effort. Climbing the Tall Dune gives you an incredible view of the dune field and Sangre De Cristos mountain range that hug against the dunes. Not only are the view incredible, but the sense of accomplishment you get when you reach the top makes it all worth it. I made this shot about ¾ of the way up the dune looking over the impressive landscape. The patterns in the dunes almost seem to match the patterns and crags of the mountains. It had rained that morning so some of the dunes had this beautiful striped pattern that added even more depth to the scene. Ominous storm clouds loomed over the 12,000ft elevation peaks of the range and gave the scene a very foreboding feel. This shot captures all the chaos of the area. The intricate patterns of the dunes against the rugged terrain of the mountains and the erratic changes in weather. You truly are in a wilderness here and it sure feels like it when you’re hiking in this area.


Great Sand Dunes National Park: Tall DuneGreat Sand Dunes National Park: Tall DuneStunning view on the way up Tall Dune in Great Sand Dunes National Park. © Ben Jacobi

                After I made this exposure we continued on eventually reaching the top and took in the marvelous view in front of us. To the west Star Dune (tallest dune in North America) could be seen. But we would have to save that challenge for another time. With the approaching rains, stronger wind gusts, and hunger/fatigue setting in it was time we made the trek back down. Which was actually quite enjoyable—you can get down much faster than climbing up. I’m looking forward to sharing more of my latest work with you all.

]]> (Photography by Ben Jacobi) colorado dunes great sand dunes national park landscape nature pic of the week sand dunes sky travel Thu, 07 Dec 2017 16:00:00 GMT
Pic of the Week 10/19/17: Great Dunes and Greater Mountains Pic of the Week 10/19/17

"Great Dunes, Greater Mountains"

Date taken: 9/24/17

Location: Zapata Falls Recreation Area, CO


Who is ready for more Colorado photos? This weeks Pic of the Week was captured on our third day of our Colorado trip. The previous day we had shot early morning sunrise photos of Mt Blanca, hiked up the Big Dune in Great Sand Dunes National Park, and ended with a rain shower blocking out our chance for a sunset. When we started to drive back to our camp for the night clouds covered our skies and we were constantly in rain. This had me worried for sunrise and most of our shooting the next day. But we climbed up in our sleeping bags and drifted to sleep with the sound of rain drops "pit-pattering" on the tent. We awoke once again very early and I stepped out the tent to observe the skies. There was some clouds off to our west, but I could see clearing to our east. In fact, I could make out the bright constellation Orion hovering in the sky above. Everyone was woken up and we tore down our campsite and gathered our gear and drove to our sunrise location. Sunrise was nice, but nothing extravagant and after we collected all our sunrise images we continued down the road to our next stop, Zapata Falls. 

To reach Zapata Falls you turn down a small gravel road that leads you to the base of a mountain. The drive to the falls was very interesting. The gravel road quickly transitioned to a dirt/rock road and started to gain elevation. The road was only a few miles long, but it took us 30min to reach the end in our little Ford Focus we rented for the trip. Every dip and rise over the rocks had us grimacing and praying that we wouldn't pop a tire. Eventually we reached the top and the end of the road and the trailhead to Zapata Falls. There was a small overlook outside the campground that gave you a fantastic view of the San Luis Valley, Great Sand Dunes, and the Sangre de Cristos mountain range. The mountains were still covered by the clouds, so I didn't take any photos from the overlook. 

The trail to Zapata Falls was easy, but I am not used to hiking in 9000' elevation so we took our time. The trail eventually runs into a creek and you have to wade through the creek to access the falls. The falls themselves were actually quite nice and when I had them all to myself it was peaceful, but soon many more people started coming up the trail and  through the creek getting in front of my camera and ending up in my shots. But I got what I wanted and then started back towards the trail. I noticed the clouds above us had mostly cleared and I hoped it was true with the mountains. There were a few spots on the trail where we could see the tops of the mountains between the trees and I was excited to see those peaks. I might be able to capture a shot from the overlook after all. 

After our hike, I reached into the car and pulled out my Tamron 70-200mm telephoto lens and headed towards the overlook. The clouds had cleared and finally revealed the mountains to us. Not only that the rain and weather on the peaks left a fresh dusting of snow on the majestic mountains. I zoomed in tight and found a composition that worked showing the flat San Luis Valley, that transitioned to the delicate curves of the sand dunes and then met with the jagged and craggy snow-covered peaks of the Sange de Cristos. Although the lighting was less than ideal the intermittent light and shadows played on the landscape making an almost dreamy scene. I snapped several image from the overlook, but I had issues with the trees around the area getting into some of my shots. To solve this, I climbed up a stone platform that rose me just above the tree line where I was able to make my images with an unobstructed view of the wonderful landscape. This image ended up being one of my favorite photos from the trip and is another photo that will be featured in my 2018 calendar. 


© Ben Jacobi

]]> (Photography by Ben Jacobi) colorado great sand dunes landscape mountains nature pic of the week sange de cristos sky travel Thu, 19 Oct 2017 16:57:42 GMT
Pic of the Week 10/12/17: Aspens in Mueller State Park Pic of the Week 10/12/17

“Aspens in Mueller State Park”

Date taken: 9/24/17

Location: Mueller State Park near Divide, CO


This week's Pic of the Week takes us to our last full day in Colorado. Earlier that morning we shot the sunrise in the San Luis valley and photographed some nice vistas near Monarch and Buena Vista, CO. Our goal was to arrive in Muller State Park a few hours before sunset to scout out locations for the sunset. When arrived at the park I went in the visitor center to talk with the park staff and get their recommendations for a good sunset location. More specifically, I wanted an area where we could see the Pikes Peak massif and capture the sunset light traveling up the mountain. Maybe even have a few aspen in the foreground, who knows? After talking with one of the rangers there she suggested we try Elk meadow. It was a great view of Pikes Peak and unobstructed by roads, buildings, and other distractions intersecting our shot—just a nice meadow and then forest. She also gave us ideas on where we could go to photograph some of the fall foliage. Her suggestion was to try the northern most trails behind the campgrounds. This area was supposed to have some aspen.


While it wasn't part of our plans, we had some extra time and I am always up for a hike, we reached the parking area for the trailhead and gathered our gear to get ready for a short hike. Looking at the trail maps I thought we could use trail 17 that would take us to the eastern edge of the trail and to a nice open field and hopefully find some nice compositions there. I thought we would only need to hike about .3 miles where we could grab some quick shots and be back to our sunset location. We followed trail 17 for about .25miles before there was a clearing in the forest. The open field gave us a nice view of Pikes Peak and the forest in front of it. Speckled all throughout the forest were bright yellow aspen. I captured a few nice images, but wasn't overly excited about what I had. Maybe it would be nice if the light was better, I pondered to myself. But I didn't let that thought distract me. I knew that we needed to be ready for sunset soon. Still I pressed on down the trail in hopes of finding a more interesting scene. After a brief walk I came to a curve on the trail and just before the curve there was a big field leading out into the forest and an excellent view of Pikes Peak. The best part was the light was positioned in a way that really brought out the aspens in the foreground. This was where I stopped set up my tripod and sarted shooting. The golden aspens, the red rock on Pikes Peak, and the deep blue sky made for an excellent scene just begging to be photographed.


© Ben Jacobi


Turns out we went a bit further than I had anticipated and we were now hurrying to get back in the car in time for sunset. We arrived about 20 minutes before sunset and shot some more excellent images of aspen and Pikes Peak in sunset light. After this long day, we retired to our hotel in Colorado Springs and turned in for the night. This was one of my favorite shots I captured that day. In fact, it is going to be featured in my upcoming 2018 calendar as the month of September. If you would like to preorder a calendar send me an email or a Facebook message.

]]> (Photography by Ben Jacobi) aspen autumn colorado fall landscape mountains mueller state park nature pic of the week pikes peak sky travel Thu, 12 Oct 2017 15:58:14 GMT
Pic of the Week 10/5/17: Blanca Peak Sunrise Pic of the Week 10/5/17

“Blanca Peak Sunrise”

Date taken: 9/23/17

Location: Highway 160 near Blanca, CO.


Continuing through the wild photo adventure that was my recent trip to Colorado, we arrive pre-sunrise on the second day of the trip and it was going to be a big one. Ian, Jaden, and myself had spent the previous day cramped up in the small Ford Focus we drove to Colorado. We drove through a small portion of the Highway of Legends, photographed the sunset from the lake, and ended it with a short milky way shoot behind the mountains. Needless to say, we were pretty exhausted from the traveling and turned in early for a good nights rest. The next day was going to be a busy. We had planned a sunrise shoot, a trip to Great Sand Dunes National Park during the day, and ending it with sunset shoot at San Luis Lake State Park. I did have concerns about the weather for 9/23. Some models were suggesting extensive cloud cover and wide spread rain over the area which would prevent us from seeing a good sunrise. Only time would tell.


I awoke around 4:30am before the alarm on my cell phone went off. I pulled up my phone and checked the infrared satellite and radar for our area. Nothing was really conclusive with the data so I would have to rely on good ol' observation. Ourside the tent it was perfectly still, there was no wind and only the chirping of crickets could be heard. There were patches of dark sky with a few stars in between the clouds. I looked off towards the west and could see a band of clear sky, this was the direction we would be traveling today. At 5:15am my alarm went off and woke everybody up, we gathered our gear and breakfast and climbed back in the car to make the 60 mile drive to our sunrise location.


When I learned we were not going to the Guadalupe Mountains for this trip I decided to go to Colorado as a backup. Thankfully, I had a cache of locations and sights I wanted to see stored on Google Earth. Its good having this information at my disposal, it makes it much easier when planning shots for a trip. One location I had marked was a scenic viewpoint off highway 160 outside of Blanca, CO. The pulloff gave an excellent view of the southern most Sangre De Cristos mountains. The goal was to arrive before sunrise and scout out compostitions and wait for sunrise.


When we arrived on location the skies around us had pretty much cleared, but one thing I didn't take into account was the elevation of the mountains and the cloud deck. The massive peaks were completely swallowed by a dark moody cloud which may not work so well for the sunrise shot I had envisioned. We waited for almost an hour watching the clouds slowly lift around the lower parts of the mountain, but the peaks were still covered by the clouds when the sun rose. Glorious warm light spread over the landscape and lit up most of the mountains. The 14,345' (elev) top of Blanca Peak could not be seen and we waited and waited as more and more cloud cover began to dissipate. Half of the mountain was bathed in the golden sunrise light, bringing the aspen in the foothills to an almost radiant state. The other half was shrouded in the shadow of the clouds turning everything near the top to a soft murky outline, almost ghost-like in appearance. I opted to use my telephoto lens and bring everything much closer revealing all of the drama in the scene. The tight shot also shows the little nuances of the photo. For instance you can see in the transition where some of the aspen are shining bright and the just behind them the other's fade into the shadows. It was a very dramatic scene and we captured it for quite a long time.


Eventually the clouds began to clear exposing the photogenic Mout Lindsey and Little Bear Peak, but Blanca Peak still remained in the clouds. In fact, for the rest of the day Blanca Peak would be masked by cloud cover and we wouldn't see it until the next sunrise. I have to say I was quite impressed with the photos I captured during this shoot, though it didn't come out like I had originally planned. It was still an excellent way to start our first full day in Colorado. I am quite fortunate to have these shots. After I got back home from this trip my hard drive got corrupted and erased 140+ images from this day. Luckily, I was able to recover all but ten of them. One of the ones recovered was this shot right here. I still have many more photos and stories to share from this trip.


Blanca Peak SunriseBlanca Peak Sunrise © Ben Jacobi

]]> (Photography by Ben Jacobi) aspen autumn blanca peak colorado fall landscape mountains nature pic of the week sange de cristos sky sunrise travel Thu, 05 Oct 2017 16:50:36 GMT
Pic of the Week 9/28/17: Spanish Peaks Sunset Pic of the Week 9/28/17

"Spanish Peaks Sunset"

Date Taken: 9/22/17

Location: Lathrop State Park Walsenburg, CO


I have just returned from an amazing four-day trip to the beautiful state of Colorado. I was originally going to the Guadalupe Mountains in west Texas, but the weather pattern had another idea. So as I backup I suggested Colorado. My good friends Ian Glasgow and Jaden Corbin. This was Jaden’s first photo trip with us and I think he had a good time. We spent those four days seeking out the best shots for the incredible landscape that was all around us. We were about one week away from peak fall color, but we were able to get some excellent shots of the changing autumn.

We left Wichita Falls around 7:15am and arrived at Walsenburg just a little before 2:30pm (local time) and went exploring for our sunset location. I had hopes that the clouds would hold off and we would get dramatic sunrise light hitting the Spanish Peaks. The Spanish Peaks are two very prominent mountains in southern Colorado. The west peak has an elevation of 13,645’ and the eastern peak is 12,684 and an impressive 6000 feet above the surrounding landscape. Their shape and prominence made me think they would be an excellent subject to use in dramatic sunset light.

After we did some driving through the Highway of Legends (a closer look at the Spanish Peaks), we started back to Lathrop State Park to prepare for sunset. I kept an eye on the cloud cover on our western horizon and I watched as the thin clouds stretched above our heads. Maybe these would make for a good sunset after all. But they might pose a problem if we were going to shoot the milky way later that evening.

The dramatic light I was hoping for never arrived and the sun was blocked by a low layer of cloud cover, but despite this the clouds above us exploded into a fiery orange glow. I still came back with some great shots and a pretty nice timelapse of the whole thing, but the worst thing was I accidentally changed my camera settings to record In JPG and not NEF (Nikon’s RAW). This meant I would have very little control in post processing and I would need to adjust my workflow to get the result I wanted. It just goes to show you, always check your camera settings before you start shooting. This is a silly oversight that I will make sure I won’t skip over next time. Luckily, after the sunset I saw my error and changed back to NEF for the milky way shoot. Yet despite this hiccup I still came back with some excellent images and even better ones came from later in the trip. I am very excited to share these photos with you over the next few weeks. Enjoy!


Stunning sunset over Lathrop State Park with the Spanish Peaks on the horizon. © Ben Jacobi


]]> (Photography by Ben Jacobi) colorado landscape lathrop state park mountains nature pic of the week sky spanish peaks sunset travel Thu, 28 Sep 2017 16:45:00 GMT
Pic of the Week 9/14/17: Sunset on the Rio Grande Pic of the Week 9/14/17

"Sunset on the Rio Grande"

Date Taken: 9/3/17

Location: Rio Grande Gorge Bridge near Taos, NM


"OK. I think I'm clear now." I quickly darted my head to the left and then the right looking off into the highway. There were several vehicles approaching on both sides. I maybe had 15 seconds before the vehicles made it to the bridge. One by one they crossed over and with each one came a shock wave of vibrations that caused the bridge I was standing on to resonate. The vibration forced me to grasp the handrail next to me. Maybe I'm being a little dramatic, but I don't care for heights, so standing on a shaking bridge some 700ft above the ground made me a tad nervous. But I persevered and when the shaking stopped, I once again looked back to see if more cars were coming. I would look to my right, then my left, and then look towards the sunset and back to my scene to see how the light was falling on the landscape. This was why I was here. Oh, those things we do for our photography, like stepping out of our comfort zones to capture that one superb moment.

There I was looking down below to the Rio Grande River in northern New Mexico standing on the Rio Grande Gorge Bridge waiting for the perfect light and clinging on to the hand rail for dear life when cars came driving by. Its funny, because last year on Labor Day weekend I was in the southern part of New Mexico isolating myself in White Sands National Monument and the Tularosa basin, but now I was in northern New Mexico near the heavily traffic towns of Taos and Santa Fe. This time I was accompanied by my good friend and fellow photographer Jim Livingston. I don't have three-day weekends very often, so I try to take advantage when I can and I convinced Jim (although it didn't take much) to ride with me to New Mexico. Here it was coming to the close of our first day there and I was set ready to capture my "hero" shot. My idea was to capture the Rio Grande River cutting through the gorge and leading the eye to the Sange de Cristos mountain range on the distant horizon. Sunset light would just graze the top of the gorge and spill beautifully on the mountains and maybe, if I was lucky, see some nice clouds soaking up some of the sunset color. But that was the ideal shot, Mother Nature always has her own agenda. The mountains were difficult to see due to the smoke and haze from the wildfires in the Pacific Northwest. This haze kept the contrast low on our horizon and in the mountains. There was also a thick cloud bank off to the west which concerned me. We may not even see a sunset. But I made my peace with it and headed out to the gorge anyways.

When we arrived to the bridge the sun was in between cloud cover which gave me a little more hope of capturing my "hero" shot. After some scouting, I found my composition and set up my tripod and staked my claim of the observation platform. I sat there shooting photos and turning around to check for approaching vehicles. Between the cars and the wind I was able to shoot off several bracketed exposures of the same composition. Finally, the sun became low on the horizon and just above the cloud deck to the west. This was the time to capture as close to the shot I had envisioned. The light just kissed the top of the gorge and the canyon wall and while it wasn't the crazy dramatic light I was hoping for, it was still a remarkable scene. Perhaps the best thing was the patches of clouds that absorbed all the color from sunset giving the sky some nice texture. In fact, there is so much texture in this shot. You have the texture of the river, texture of the gorge, texture in the mountains, and texture in the clouds. This gives this image great depth and dimension. It is without a doubt, my "hero" shot from this trip to New Mexico and I'm very happy with how the final image came out. I have many more NM photos coming soon! 


Susnet on the Rio Grande Gorge © Ben Jacobi


]]> (Photography by Ben Jacobi) cliff gorge landscape nature new mexico pic of the week rio grande rio grande gorge rio grande gorge bridge river sky taos travel Thu, 14 Sep 2017 16:15:00 GMT
Pic of the Week 8/31/17 "New Mexico: Land of Enchantment" Pic of the Week 8/31/17

"New Mexico: Land of Enchantment"

Date Taken: 8/12/17

Location: San Jon, NM


Just like last week's Pic of the Week we are in New Mexico for this week. In fact, we are even on the same day. I'll just go ahead and say that 8/12/17 was an excellent photography outing. I met up with my good friend Jim Livingston at his home in Amarillo. We were going to be driving into eastern New Mexico in hopes of clear skies for the Perseids meteor shower. Around 6pm we left Jim's house and drove west on I-40 towards New Mexico. Along the way we could see isolated thunderstorms building in the hot summer air. Earlier that afternoon I had driven through 40 miles of precip so I was a little discouraged when I saw the storms building. After all, our plan was to shoot the meteor shower, a task which can be very challenging under cloudy skies.

But as we continued driving we watched as the storm began to gain strength and evolve into a massive billowing updraft. The storm itself was photogenic, but there wasn't much of a foreground interest to shoot the scene. We continued west on 40 keeping an eye on the storm. We were just a few miles outside of San Jon, NM when the Caprock Escarpment came into view. Now this would serve as an excellent foreground to the storm! We turned south out of San Jon and headed towards the caprock. Bursts of sunlight were sneaking through the clouds and lighting up isolated areas of the landscape. We couldn't wait any longer and at the first good available road we pulled up and quickly got our gear out and started shooting.

We watched as the storm brewed and churned over the caprock taking on some amazing shapes and contrast. For a few hours we sat there watching the storm and shooting still as well as timelapse images. When sunset rolled around the show really began! The storm clouds became very contrasty, some soaking up the golden sunset light and some falling into the dark shadows and core of the thunderstorm. The light was near perfect shining just slightly on the caprock in front of us highlighting the interesting parts of the caprock and reflecting some of the windmills on the top. As I was shooting, the sun reached the perfect angle to light up a rain shaft and revealed a small, but photogenic rainbow. I pulled out my Tamron 70-200mm f/2.8 lens and zoomed in on the scene. The telephoto lens compresses and brings everything in the photo tight together making the storm appear closer. This also brought the windmills up larger in the frame helping to establish a sense of scale in the scene.

I shot about 10 frames during this time before the light and rainbow vanished. It didn't last but for a few moments, but it was excellent. All you could hear was the clicks of our shutters and the gasps of our excitation. It was truly an enchanting scene. As the storm progressed further northeast it started to lose its organization and quickly dried up. New towers started to go up along the outflow of the previous thunderstorm. The light had all but disappeared except for the tops of the storm and we stayed and watched until all the light was gone. 

The New Mexico state slogan is "New Mexico: Land of Enchantment" and I couldn't think of a more appropriate title for the images I captured that evening. We continued on through the night shooting the fantastic night sky counting meteors that zipped overhead and hoping they were in our shots. It was an amazing impromptu trip that resulted in some of my favorite photos I've shot this whole year. 


Monsoon thunderstorm rolls in over the Caprock Escarpment south of San Jon, NM. © Ben Jacobi



]]> (Photography by Ben Jacobi) Thu, 31 Aug 2017 16:30:00 GMT
Pic of the Week 8/24/17: 2017 Perseids Meteor Shower: Taiban, NM It has been almost a month since my last “Pic of the Week” and without getting too much into the boring details I haven't been updating the website because I was searching for a new web hosting service. I have come to the conclusion that I will finish out the year using my current hosting provider and then will move to a new one in 2018. Now that that's out of the way lets talk about this week's Pic of the Week.


Pic of the Week 8/24/17

“2017 Perseids Meteor Shower Taiban, NM”

Date taken: 8/12/17

Location: Taiban, NM


August always brings us some great night time photo opportunities. Perhaps the most famous of these would be the annual Perseids meteor shower. This year was we would have to battle the waxing gibbous moon and possibility of cloud cover. Where I live in Wichita Falls we were expecting cloud cover all through the afternoon into the following morning so I was closely watching the satellite and trying to decide where to go. Judging by the model trends the only spot that seemed to remain clear was eastern, NM. I remember talking with my good friend Jim Livingston about possible locations and he mentioned an abandoned church in the community of Taiban, NM. I called Jim up and asked if he was still going out and if so could I tag along. He happily said I could join and after work I made the 3hr 20min drive to Amarillo, TX.


I arrived in Amarillo just after 5:30pm and met Jim at his home. It had been a while since we went on a photo shoot together so it was nice seeing him again. We greeted each other and began talking about the news in our lives, but then the conversation quickly changed to how we wanted to photograph the meteor shower. Jim showed me where the church was located and we planned out our route hoping we would find something else to photograph along the way. Taiban was about a 2.5hr drive from Amarillo so we wanted to get leaving pretty soon. Jim had to make a quick phone call to a friend a fellow photographer Mark Dieker who was in New Mexico and we arranged to meet at the church after dark. We gathered up all our gear, grabbed some gas, and purchased some snacks then headed down I-40 towards the Texas/New Mexico border.


While driving down I-40 I kept looking off in the distance at some billowing thunderheads over the caprock. I thought it would make a nice shot and Jim agreed, we turned south once we reached San Jon and met the storm face to face. We watched the storm build and boil until the sunset where the thunderheads soaked up all the sunset colors like a sponge. It was an incredible shoot, but we still needed to get to the church on time. We turned back north and continued on 40 where we reached Tucumcari and then turned south following some of the backroads to Taiban, NM. Along the way we stopped and shot some images of the milky way under an unobstructed sky. We even found a great location with three windmills on the top of a mesa, we stayed a shot there for a little while before finally reaching Taiban, NM.


We pulled into the “packing area” of the old Presbetyrian church and surveyed the sky above us. There was a thick low cloud from thunderstorms to our north that was blocking out the entire northern sky we did, however, have a nice clear view to our south. We approached the old church and walked inside for closer inspection. We decided to leave a flashlight inside to church to light it up. I set up my composition and started to adjust some of my camera settings when a fast green meteor whizzed overhead. I was hoping this was a sign of things to come. We stayed there for a few hours catching brief glimpses of meteors before the moonlight washed out our sky and the cloud cover set in. This is a time-stack composite made from 12 different images to show the meteor shower in one photo. If you look closely you can see 10 meteors in the shot. We would continue to shoot in NM until about 3am where the cloud cover got too thick. Although, it was noting like last year's meteor shower it was still a great time and we all came back with some excellent photos. I'm looking forward to the next adventure!


Meteors streak across a starry sky over the ghost town of Taiban, NM. © Ben Jacobi

]]> (Photography by Ben Jacobi) meteor meteor shower nature new mexico night pic of the week sky travel Thu, 24 Aug 2017 16:45:00 GMT
Pic of the Week: 7/27/17: Once in a Lifetime Capture Pic of the Week 7/27/17

"Once in a Lifetime Capture"

Date taken: 7/27/14

Location: St John's Chapel Bomarton, TX


When I'm telling the story behind my images I'll frequently use words like "awesome", "epic", "incredible" and even "surreal". While this is true, and the general emotion I was feeling when making those captures, nothing has ever compared to my "Once in a Lifetime Capture". It doesn't seem like it has been three years since I recorded one of the wildest and surreal experiences of my life. Witnessing it, was an incredible treat from the heavens, but getting to record and share it with other's is even more exciting! Three years ago I was meeting up with some of my good friends for some night photography. We decided to use St John's chapel in the ghost town of Bomarton, TX. The first church was built in 1909, but after a fire and some structure damage the new brick church was constructed in 1936. The beautiful old chapel would serve as our anchor point as we tried to capture images of the milky way around and behind it. 

Mike was kind enough to let me ride with him to Bomarton and we met Jim Livingston at the church. Around 9pm we arrived to Bomarton and the church. We got out and exchanged greetings. This was Mike's first night shoot and first time meeting Jim. Jim has been a good friend of mine for a while now and I always enjoy shooting with him. He has a passion and drive to capture great, meaningful images and helping other's do the same. The sun started to set and we set up for some milky way photos. We spent a few hour showing Mike how to photograph the milky way and how to light paint. We captured some nice images that night including some shots of the interior of the church. After that we continued around to the south side of the church. Jim brought a spotlight to use for light painting and it was suggested that we try to capture a beam of light hitting the cross on the top of the steeple. After a few attempts we finally had the right approach and we were able to capture that image. It looked pretty nice. Jim suggested we change our position. He said " Come over here to the other side and shoot the milky way behind the church. I can still use the spotlight to paint the steeple." We agreed and moved over to the other side. This was absolutely crucial for what happened next. 

We started shooting off some frames and were enjoying the images we captured. And then something incredible happened. I shot off an exposure as did Mike and Jim began to paint the steeple. The stars and milky way in the night sky were shining brightly and the weather was quite tolerable, which is pretty rare in late July. I heard the shutter of my camera release as I stood there watching the night sky. And then out of nowhere, we saw a bright flash and the sky split and a magnificent fireball meteor came through the scene bisecting our night sky. The light from this meteor was so bright and pure you thought it was daytime. The fireball lasted for several seconds and we watched as it broke up into smaller pieces. It was so intense that you could hear the faint booms and hiss as it burned in the atmosphere. It was the most awesome, epic, incredible, and surreal experience of my life.

We were jumping around screaming like a bunch of little kids just amazed at the sight we just witnessed and then I heard the sound of my shutter closing. The click seemed to echo forever and I remember thinking to myself there was no way I captured this unbelievable moment. I thought it was way too bright for my exposure settings. I thought all I was going to get was a giant white blob that would be unrecoverable in post processing. I didn't care, though. I was just excited that we got to witness such a remarkable event. I pressed the playback button on my camera and looked on the LCD screen. I felt my heart sink into my stomach and a chill going up and down my spine when I saw the photo. I was wrong--dead wrong. What I had before me was a near perfect exposure of the event. I stood there for several seconds just trying to understand what had just happened. Then I seemed to be snapped back in reality when I heard Jim's voice shout "Did you get it?".

"I got it!" I shouted back. Mike also shouted "I got it too!". I captured the full path of the meteor almost perfectly aligned with the church. Mike was in a little bit tighter and he captured a nice close up view of teh church tower. We all huddled around each other's cameras marveling at the photographs we just captured. But then there was a sobering moment when Jim remembered where his camera was. He was facing the opposite direction and shooting a tighter shot of the steeple, unfortunately he missed it. But Jim couldn't be happier for us and I know he was excited to help us capture this once in a lifetime image. I had captured a historic church in front of the milky way, with a beam of light touching the steeple, and a fireball meteor shooting across the scene. I will likely never get to capture such a thing again and I am truly fine with that. This will forever be my Once in a Lifetime Capture. 

Once in a Lifetime CaptureOnce in a Lifetime Capture © Ben Jacobi

]]> (Photography by Ben Jacobi) Thu, 27 Jul 2017 16:45:00 GMT
Pic of the Week 7/14/17: Whickham Marsh Sunrise Pic of the Week 7/14/17

"Whickham Marsh Sunrise"

Location: Whickham Marsh State Wildlife Management Area near Port Kent, NY

Date taken: 7/14/13


We're going back a bit for the week's Pic of the Week. It was three years ago to the day I was in upstate New York visiting for a family reunion. Its always nice to get up there and visit with my other side of the family, and it had been a while since our last reunion in Indiana. July 14 was our last full day before we departed back to Texas and it was also my big photography day. My aunt Becky would once again be leading me through the Adirondacks for nature photography.

After a busy day in Vermont eating at the Old Stowe homestead the guys returned to Aunt Becky's house to play some poker (this is a tradition among me and my cousins). After the card game and the comradery, it was time to send everyone home so I could get some rest for the next day. This was going to be a busy day we had plans to look for bald eagles on Lake Champlain and the Ausable River, then we were driving to Whiteface Mountain where a gondola ride would take us to the top of Little Whiteface afterwards, we would drive to the summit of Whiteface Mountain. So a big day was planned. 

 I woke up a little late that morning because I forgot to set the alarm on my cell phone so my sleep was interrupted by the blaring ring of an old telephone. I immediately woke up and picked up the phone it was aunt Becky and she was checking to make sure I was getting ready--I am very glad she did as I would've likely overslept. I quickly got ready and got my gear together and we got into her car and drove off to our first stop. Our first stop was somewhere along the shore of Lake Champlain watching the sunrise. While it was a very nice sunrise over the lake I couldn't really find a photograph I liked from the bunch and we continued on searching for other shots and wildlife. 

We pulled up at a parking lot in the Whickham Marsh State Wildlife Management Area and started off towards the overlook. The overlook sets you along the edge of the marsh and our idea was to stay there and see what wildlife show up. I gathered my camera bag and started walking on the foot trail. The trail was not long, maybe a quarter of a mile at most, and we were in deep dense forest most of the way. I would come across the occasional break in the treeline and would see the distant landscape lit up by the early morning sun. It was quite peaceful and serene. In a short amount of time I reached the overlook and watched as this beautiful scene unfolded before me.

I was facing almost due west and could see the gibbous moon drifting towards the horizon while early morning light reflected off the clouds giving them a nice pink glow. Looking out over the marsh I could just make out the fog that was hovering above the surface of the water and as the sun got higher and higher in the sky the fog would start to retreat. I found a composition that I really liked showing the moon, clouds, fog, and the marsh in the shot. The close proximity of the surrounding vegetation better immerses you in the landscape almost like your peeking through the dense forest and wetland. I shot off a few exposures and went with the best one to process the final image. I really enjoy the strong triad color combination of the reds, greens, and blues in the photo. It gives the image a very tranquil feeling and I can't help but feel more relaxed looking at it.

This is one of my favorite images I have taken in my visits to New York and one that I hold near my heart. This was my last photography outing with my aunt Becky, shortly after this trip she started getting sick and discovered she had cancer. This was also the last time I saw her in person. I wouldn't return to New York until her funeral. Thank you aunt Becky for waking me up in time to capture such a beautiful image. We love you and miss you very much. 


Whickham Marsh: New YorkWhickham Marsh: New York © Ben Jacobi

]]> (Photography by Ben Jacobi) Fri, 14 Jul 2017 16:30:00 GMT