Pic of the Week 1/18/18: Red River Aerial

January 18, 2018  •  1 Comment

Pic of the Week 1/18/18
"Red River"
Location: Red River on the TX/OK border
Date taken: 1/26/14

    I love photography and I really love meeting other passionate photographers. We photographers can get together and "talk shop" for hours on end. One of the better things about meeting and connecting with other photographers is the chance for networking. Through my job I have met some really great people and photographers and I have made some incredible friendships along the way. One of those connections brought a unique opportunity to me, my friend and fellow photographer Elizabeth invited me to shoot some aerial photos. For those of you who don't know I have a fear of heights, so you would understand my hesitation and confusion by the offer. But, I thought about what kind of interesting photos I could capture from a higher perspective and the fear was replaced with curiosity and wonderment. We set a date and I decided on a subject to photograph--the Red River. The Red River is 1,360 miles long and starts in the Texas panhandle and flows southeast to Louisiana and eventually meets with the Atchafalaya River, and then flows into the Gulf of Mexico. The Red River also serves as the boundary between Texas and Oklahoma. I thought a shot of the sun rising over the red would make for a nice scene and that's what I decided on.


    I awoke to the sound of my alarm going off. I got up and checked the weather data hoping for clear skies and no wind. After browsing through the data and grabbing a quick breakfast I was off to the airport to meet with Elizabeth and my pilot Gary. I arrived to the airport and found Gary and Elizabeth going over the pre-flight checklist. It was a brisk morning and brought enough layers to handle the cold and the wind. While they were doing the inspection, I was going through my bag deciding how I wanted to shoot the images. I settled on using my 24-85mm lens on my Nikon D700. This would give me a wide enough range to photograph wide field and maybe some up close aerial photos. The time came where we were ready for take off and I hopped into the co-pilots seat. Elizabeth gave me some instruction on how to use the headset to communicate with Gary and we were going through the takeoff checklist. After the checklist Gary started the engine up. We heard it sputter and then nothing. Gary tried again, but to no avail. It was decided (by the pilots, not by myself) that the battery needed to be charged more. And I sat and watched as they loaded the chopper on the trailer and drove it to the hangar. 


Behind me the sun was just starting to greet the chilly Sunday morning and the sky began to take on the familiar red/pink hues of an early morning winter. Thin cirrus clouds whispped through the morning sky soaking up the brilliant colors. I was a little disheartened that I wasn't over the river shooting the sunrise, but I did snap a few images from the ground level view. After about a half hour they were ready to try starting the engine again. This time the engine came on and after the checklist we were ready to get airborne. As we lifted off I watched as the airport got smaller and farther away and with the gain of altitude I could really see just how flat our area is. Way off in the distance I could see the peaks of the Wichita Mountains some 60miles away. The sun was just now rising above the cirrus clouds and I was ready to start shooting. It was a short 10 minute flight to the river, but along the way we landed so Gary could remove my door. Now I had the freedom to shoot anything out my window. 


We spent the next few hours flying around the Red River and photographing various scenes of the landscape down below. This was back in 2014 and still in the height of the drought so the river was low and sandbars down below made for interesting compositions. There was one area that I seemed to think would work well for a shot. I got on the headset and let Gary know where I wanted to be asked him to fly a little bit lower. As we moved over the scene the roar of our engine startled the wildlife down below causing a flock of ducks to scatter and fly over the river. This encouraged a Great Blue heron to relocate, as well. When the birds started flying I began pressing the shutter tracking them through my camera and silently praying these shots would be in focus. The final image that I chose featured the birds mid flight over the river and the white feather of their wings contrasted nicely against the darker river. The heron's bright blue plumage stood out well against the red and rust color of the sand. I came back with some cool shots that day, but this was one of my favorites. The birds add a little extra depth, energy, and scale to the photo making easy to determine how high up we really were. I haven't done any more aerial photography since then, maybe I will need to do some this year. 

 

Red RiverRed River Aerial © Ben Jacobi


Pic of the Week 1/11/18: Highway 160 Panorama

January 11, 2018  •  Leave a Comment

© Ben Jacobi

 

Where am I going? What adventures lie ahead? What setbacks will I experience? How will my photography career grow? Did I forget to lock my front door this morning? These are questions I ask myself this time of year. I usually slow down in January and it gives me time to reminisce and plan for future photo shoots. So where do you think I should go in 2018? Leave a comment below and let me know what areas you think I should visit. I'm looking forward to see what 2018 has for me and my photography. 

 

Enjoy! 


2017 Timelapse Video

January 04, 2018  •  2 Comments

Well here we are we made it to the new year! 2018 I'm very excited to see what you have in store for me. 2017 was an excellent year for my photography. I got to travel a lot more than usual and captured some truly awe-inspiring scenes. I can't think of a better way to say goodbye to 2017 than by releasing my 2017 Timelapse Video. It took the whole year to shoot, edit, and render this timelapse project and I am so happy with how it turned out. Despite having a mediocre storm season I was able to come back with beautiful timelapse sequences of stunning landscapes and breath-taking night skies. I traveled to New York, Oklahoma, New Mexico, Colorado, and around Texas in 2017. I captured a little under 22,000 images to make up this final video and I'm very excited for you to see it. Be sure you watch it in 4k to get the full experience. Enjoy and bring on 2018!

 

2017 Timelapse Video (4k) from BDJPhoto on Vimeo.

 

 

 

 

 

YouTube: https://youtu.be/ObEk-vd-HFc


Pic of the Week 12/21/17: 2017 Geminids Meteor Shower

December 21, 2017  •  3 Comments

Pic of the Week 12/21/17

“2017 Geminids Meteor Shower”

Date taken: 12/15/17

Location: Great Plains State Park/Tom Steed Reservoir, OK

 

It has been two years since I last photographed the Geminids meteor shower and after the less than average Perseids shower in August, I was once again ready for hunting more meteors. This year was going to be great year for the shower. We were forecast to have clear skies and a crescent moon that would only break the horizon after 4am. The best time for the shower would be when the radiant was highest in the sky around 1am that night. This gave us over three hours of shooting and counting meteors. After the first two hours, I lost count at 250. The show was quite impressive. I was excited for the shower, but I knew I had work the next day so I needed to find a location that was under a 2-hour drive. I could have gone with my usual west TX dark skies such as Caprock Canyon or Copper Breaks, but I wanted to try a new location I hadn’t shot before. After some research, I settled on Great Plains State Park in southern Oklahoma. The main reason I did this was the park access is open 24/7 and it has relatively low light pollution. I spent a few days looking over the area on Google Earth and gathering information about the location.

I had invited a few of my photographer friends to join me, but the only one that was able to make it was Jaden Corbin. We left Wichita Falls around 9:30pm that night and started off towards Oklahoma. Along the way we spotted a few meteors zipping across the dark skies. We reached the park entrance and looked around for a little bit. I had an idea to photograph the meteor shower over the lake, but the light pollution across the lake was too strong to get any usable shots. I had been to Great Plains State Park before (though not at night time) and remembered a small overlook of some the mountains and Snyder Lake on the west end of the park. This would be my backup if the lake photos would not work out. We drove to the overlook and parked our car and stared at the starry night sky above. The constellation Orion was hovering over the mountains and shone in all its glory. You could make out the belt, arms, and bow of the great hunter. Behind us the milky way was dropping below the western horizon as Cassiopeia, Ursa Major, and Ursa Minor sparkled above. We set up our tripods and cameras and shot photos from this location for almost three hours. During this time, we watched as the skies became littered with streaking meteors radiating from Gemini and spreading all around us. We would be talking about a particular subject and be interrupted by the other person calling out the meteor count. While the skies were clear there were some thick clouds way off in the south and west and wind picked up after midnight. The air coming off the lake was frigid and I would jump in place trying to stay warm. The thought that I could be home and snuggled up in my warm bed seemed to overcome my desire to be outside in the cold air, but then a green flash would appear and a meteor would stretch through the scene and ignite the sky and my desire to photograph again.

 At the end of the I sat in my car warming up by the heater and looking over some of the photos. I had seen a few decent ones, but once I got home and looked at them on my computer screen I was ecstatic at the number of meteors I captured. Like usual, I opted for a time-stack composite image where I take all the meteors I captured and add them into a single frame. This method lets me show the entire event in just one image. Some people have their reservations on whether this is “true” photography. Personally, I think it’s the only way I can convey what we experienced and I hope it inspires people to get out and watch it themselves.

 It took a total of 55 images to create the final version and there are 53 meteors visible in the photo. I did take some “creative license” in the placement, but that was mostly to avoid intersecting meteors and help the image flow. Interestingly, I decided to use an exposure with the car lights on for the foreground. This was not my original intent or idea when I planned this composite, but I think it adds a little more depth and perspective. The reflected light also helps bring out the mountains and lake in the background. I am glad I got to photograph this meteor shower and I’m very glad the weather cooperated with us and we ended up with some nice images.

Enjoy and have a Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays!

 

© Ben Jacobi


Pic of the Week 12/7/17: Great Sand Dunes National Park: Tall Dune

December 07, 2017  •  Leave a Comment

                Oh my, it has been over a month since my last update. I apologize for the delay. But I haven’t just been sitting around doing nothing. I have been busy with work, my calendar sales, and I’ve been working on my 2017 Timelapse project (which I hope to release towards the end of the year). Truthfully, I lapsed one week and fell out of the schedule, but I am back again and posting. I have a lot of new photos to share with everyone and I’m very excited to y’all to see them. With that said, lets get to this week’s Pic of the Week.

 

Pic of the Week 12/7/17

“Great Sand Dunes National Park: Tall Dune”

Location: Great Sand Dunes National Park, CO

Date taken: 9/23/17

 

                When it comes to sand dunes I have a love/hate relationship. There are certainly reasons to enjoy and experience these mysterious natural areas. They’re usually very photogenic and take on interesting patterns and shapes that beckon to be photographed. Sand can be quite beautiful especially during the early morning and late evening hours when the sand reflects all the sun’s light coloring them in wonderful hues of reds, oranges, and golds. But sand can also be quite difficult. Its very rough on the camera equipment, and it tends to get everywhere. It can easily ruin cameras, lenses, flashes, tripods, etc. It can also be hard to hike or trek on. You have to work much harder to get anywhere in sand. And don’t even get me started on the wind. Wind can turn a sand dune into a sand blaster and its not fun when you’re climbing up a dune and sand is being blasted in your eyes. So why go out to places like this? Well, I guess the only answer I can come up with is “to try and conquer it”.

                When I planned this trip, I knew we were going to visit Great Sand Dunes National Park and there was no doubt in my mind we would be getting in some sand. I thought I would offer up the chance to climb the Tall Dune in the park maybe as something we could do if we had the time. But when I brought it to Ian and Jaden they were both willing to try it. The Tall Dune in GSDNP towers 699ft over the basin and is a highly trafficked area. There are no trails. You reach the parking lot and start hiking towards the large dune crest immediately to your west. To reach the top of the dune you need to crisscross over ridges like delicate switchbacks and since there is no trail sometimes you have to backtrack and find the correct path.

                Now I know it sounds like all I’m doing is complaining, and while that is true it is well worth the effort. Climbing the Tall Dune gives you an incredible view of the dune field and Sangre De Cristos mountain range that hug against the dunes. Not only are the view incredible, but the sense of accomplishment you get when you reach the top makes it all worth it. I made this shot about ¾ of the way up the dune looking over the impressive landscape. The patterns in the dunes almost seem to match the patterns and crags of the mountains. It had rained that morning so some of the dunes had this beautiful striped pattern that added even more depth to the scene. Ominous storm clouds loomed over the 12,000ft elevation peaks of the range and gave the scene a very foreboding feel. This shot captures all the chaos of the area. The intricate patterns of the dunes against the rugged terrain of the mountains and the erratic changes in weather. You truly are in a wilderness here and it sure feels like it when you’re hiking in this area.

 

Great Sand Dunes National Park: Tall DuneGreat Sand Dunes National Park: Tall DuneStunning view on the way up Tall Dune in Great Sand Dunes National Park. © Ben Jacobi

                After I made this exposure we continued on eventually reaching the top and took in the marvelous view in front of us. To the west Star Dune (tallest dune in North America) could be seen. But we would have to save that challenge for another time. With the approaching rains, stronger wind gusts, and hunger/fatigue setting in it was time we made the trek back down. Which was actually quite enjoyable—you can get down much faster than climbing up. I’m looking forward to sharing more of my latest work with you all.

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