Pic of the Week 10/12/17: Aspens in Mueller State Park

October 12, 2017  •  1 Comment

Pic of the Week 10/12/17

“Aspens in Mueller State Park”

Date taken: 9/24/17

Location: Mueller State Park near Divide, CO

 

This week's Pic of the Week takes us to our last full day in Colorado. Earlier that morning we shot the sunrise in the San Luis valley and photographed some nice vistas near Monarch and Buena Vista, CO. Our goal was to arrive in Muller State Park a few hours before sunset to scout out locations for the sunset. When arrived at the park I went in the visitor center to talk with the park staff and get their recommendations for a good sunset location. More specifically, I wanted an area where we could see the Pikes Peak massif and capture the sunset light traveling up the mountain. Maybe even have a few aspen in the foreground, who knows? After talking with one of the rangers there she suggested we try Elk meadow. It was a great view of Pikes Peak and unobstructed by roads, buildings, and other distractions intersecting our shot—just a nice meadow and then forest. She also gave us ideas on where we could go to photograph some of the fall foliage. Her suggestion was to try the northern most trails behind the campgrounds. This area was supposed to have some aspen.

 

While it wasn't part of our plans, we had some extra time and I am always up for a hike, we reached the parking area for the trailhead and gathered our gear to get ready for a short hike. Looking at the trail maps I thought we could use trail 17 that would take us to the eastern edge of the trail and to a nice open field and hopefully find some nice compositions there. I thought we would only need to hike about .3 miles where we could grab some quick shots and be back to our sunset location. We followed trail 17 for about .25miles before there was a clearing in the forest. The open field gave us a nice view of Pikes Peak and the forest in front of it. Speckled all throughout the forest were bright yellow aspen. I captured a few nice images, but wasn't overly excited about what I had. Maybe it would be nice if the light was better, I pondered to myself. But I didn't let that thought distract me. I knew that we needed to be ready for sunset soon. Still I pressed on down the trail in hopes of finding a more interesting scene. After a brief walk I came to a curve on the trail and just before the curve there was a big field leading out into the forest and an excellent view of Pikes Peak. The best part was the light was positioned in a way that really brought out the aspens in the foreground. This was where I stopped set up my tripod and sarted shooting. The golden aspens, the red rock on Pikes Peak, and the deep blue sky made for an excellent scene just begging to be photographed.

 

© Ben Jacobi

 

Turns out we went a bit further than I had anticipated and we were now hurrying to get back in the car in time for sunset. We arrived about 20 minutes before sunset and shot some more excellent images of aspen and Pikes Peak in sunset light. After this long day, we retired to our hotel in Colorado Springs and turned in for the night. This was one of my favorite shots I captured that day. In fact, it is going to be featured in my upcoming 2018 calendar as the month of September. If you would like to preorder a calendar send me an email or a Facebook message.


Pic of the Week 10/5/17: Blanca Peak Sunrise

October 05, 2017  •  2 Comments

Pic of the Week 10/5/17

“Blanca Peak Sunrise”

Date taken: 9/23/17

Location: Highway 160 near Blanca, CO.

 

Continuing through the wild photo adventure that was my recent trip to Colorado, we arrive pre-sunrise on the second day of the trip and it was going to be a big one. Ian, Jaden, and myself had spent the previous day cramped up in the small Ford Focus we drove to Colorado. We drove through a small portion of the Highway of Legends, photographed the sunset from the lake, and ended it with a short milky way shoot behind the mountains. Needless to say, we were pretty exhausted from the traveling and turned in early for a good nights rest. The next day was going to be a busy. We had planned a sunrise shoot, a trip to Great Sand Dunes National Park during the day, and ending it with sunset shoot at San Luis Lake State Park. I did have concerns about the weather for 9/23. Some models were suggesting extensive cloud cover and wide spread rain over the area which would prevent us from seeing a good sunrise. Only time would tell.

 

I awoke around 4:30am before the alarm on my cell phone went off. I pulled up my phone and checked the infrared satellite and radar for our area. Nothing was really conclusive with the data so I would have to rely on good ol' observation. Ourside the tent it was perfectly still, there was no wind and only the chirping of crickets could be heard. There were patches of dark sky with a few stars in between the clouds. I looked off towards the west and could see a band of clear sky, this was the direction we would be traveling today. At 5:15am my alarm went off and woke everybody up, we gathered our gear and breakfast and climbed back in the car to make the 60 mile drive to our sunrise location.

 

When I learned we were not going to the Guadalupe Mountains for this trip I decided to go to Colorado as a backup. Thankfully, I had a cache of locations and sights I wanted to see stored on Google Earth. Its good having this information at my disposal, it makes it much easier when planning shots for a trip. One location I had marked was a scenic viewpoint off highway 160 outside of Blanca, CO. The pulloff gave an excellent view of the southern most Sangre De Cristos mountains. The goal was to arrive before sunrise and scout out compostitions and wait for sunrise.

 

When we arrived on location the skies around us had pretty much cleared, but one thing I didn't take into account was the elevation of the mountains and the cloud deck. The massive peaks were completely swallowed by a dark moody cloud which may not work so well for the sunrise shot I had envisioned. We waited for almost an hour watching the clouds slowly lift around the lower parts of the mountain, but the peaks were still covered by the clouds when the sun rose. Glorious warm light spread over the landscape and lit up most of the mountains. The 14,345' (elev) top of Blanca Peak could not be seen and we waited and waited as more and more cloud cover began to dissipate. Half of the mountain was bathed in the golden sunrise light, bringing the aspen in the foothills to an almost radiant state. The other half was shrouded in the shadow of the clouds turning everything near the top to a soft murky outline, almost ghost-like in appearance. I opted to use my telephoto lens and bring everything much closer revealing all of the drama in the scene. The tight shot also shows the little nuances of the photo. For instance you can see in the transition where some of the aspen are shining bright and the just behind them the other's fade into the shadows. It was a very dramatic scene and we captured it for quite a long time.

 

Eventually the clouds began to clear exposing the photogenic Mout Lindsey and Little Bear Peak, but Blanca Peak still remained in the clouds. In fact, for the rest of the day Blanca Peak would be masked by cloud cover and we wouldn't see it until the next sunrise. I have to say I was quite impressed with the photos I captured during this shoot, though it didn't come out like I had originally planned. It was still an excellent way to start our first full day in Colorado. I am quite fortunate to have these shots. After I got back home from this trip my hard drive got corrupted and erased 140+ images from this day. Luckily, I was able to recover all but ten of them. One of the ones recovered was this shot right here. I still have many more photos and stories to share from this trip.

 

Blanca Peak SunriseBlanca Peak Sunrise © Ben Jacobi


Pic of the Week 9/28/17: Spanish Peaks Sunset

September 28, 2017  •  Leave a Comment

Pic of the Week 9/28/17

"Spanish Peaks Sunset"

Date Taken: 9/22/17

Location: Lathrop State Park Walsenburg, CO

 

I have just returned from an amazing four-day trip to the beautiful state of Colorado. I was originally going to the Guadalupe Mountains in west Texas, but the weather pattern had another idea. So as I backup I suggested Colorado. My good friends Ian Glasgow and Jaden Corbin. This was Jaden’s first photo trip with us and I think he had a good time. We spent those four days seeking out the best shots for the incredible landscape that was all around us. We were about one week away from peak fall color, but we were able to get some excellent shots of the changing autumn.

We left Wichita Falls around 7:15am and arrived at Walsenburg just a little before 2:30pm (local time) and went exploring for our sunset location. I had hopes that the clouds would hold off and we would get dramatic sunrise light hitting the Spanish Peaks. The Spanish Peaks are two very prominent mountains in southern Colorado. The west peak has an elevation of 13,645’ and the eastern peak is 12,684 and an impressive 6000 feet above the surrounding landscape. Their shape and prominence made me think they would be an excellent subject to use in dramatic sunset light.

After we did some driving through the Highway of Legends (a closer look at the Spanish Peaks), we started back to Lathrop State Park to prepare for sunset. I kept an eye on the cloud cover on our western horizon and I watched as the thin clouds stretched above our heads. Maybe these would make for a good sunset after all. But they might pose a problem if we were going to shoot the milky way later that evening.

The dramatic light I was hoping for never arrived and the sun was blocked by a low layer of cloud cover, but despite this the clouds above us exploded into a fiery orange glow. I still came back with some great shots and a pretty nice timelapse of the whole thing, but the worst thing was I accidentally changed my camera settings to record In JPG and not NEF (Nikon’s RAW). This meant I would have very little control in post processing and I would need to adjust my workflow to get the result I wanted. It just goes to show you, always check your camera settings before you start shooting. This is a silly oversight that I will make sure I won’t skip over next time. Luckily, after the sunset I saw my error and changed back to NEF for the milky way shoot. Yet despite this hiccup I still came back with some excellent images and even better ones came from later in the trip. I am very excited to share these photos with you over the next few weeks. Enjoy!

 

Stunning sunset over Lathrop State Park with the Spanish Peaks on the horizon. © Ben Jacobi

 


Pic of the Week 9/14/17: Sunset on the Rio Grande

September 14, 2017  •  3 Comments

Pic of the Week 9/14/17

"Sunset on the Rio Grande"

Date Taken: 9/3/17

Location: Rio Grande Gorge Bridge near Taos, NM

 

"OK. I think I'm clear now." I quickly darted my head to the left and then the right looking off into the highway. There were several vehicles approaching on both sides. I maybe had 15 seconds before the vehicles made it to the bridge. One by one they crossed over and with each one came a shock wave of vibrations that caused the bridge I was standing on to resonate. The vibration forced me to grasp the handrail next to me. Maybe I'm being a little dramatic, but I don't care for heights, so standing on a shaking bridge some 700ft above the ground made me a tad nervous. But I persevered and when the shaking stopped, I once again looked back to see if more cars were coming. I would look to my right, then my left, and then look towards the sunset and back to my scene to see how the light was falling on the landscape. This was why I was here. Oh, those things we do for our photography, like stepping out of our comfort zones to capture that one superb moment.

There I was looking down below to the Rio Grande River in northern New Mexico standing on the Rio Grande Gorge Bridge waiting for the perfect light and clinging on to the hand rail for dear life when cars came driving by. Its funny, because last year on Labor Day weekend I was in the southern part of New Mexico isolating myself in White Sands National Monument and the Tularosa basin, but now I was in northern New Mexico near the heavily traffic towns of Taos and Santa Fe. This time I was accompanied by my good friend and fellow photographer Jim Livingston. I don't have three-day weekends very often, so I try to take advantage when I can and I convinced Jim (although it didn't take much) to ride with me to New Mexico. Here it was coming to the close of our first day there and I was set ready to capture my "hero" shot. My idea was to capture the Rio Grande River cutting through the gorge and leading the eye to the Sange de Cristos mountain range on the distant horizon. Sunset light would just graze the top of the gorge and spill beautifully on the mountains and maybe, if I was lucky, see some nice clouds soaking up some of the sunset color. But that was the ideal shot, Mother Nature always has her own agenda. The mountains were difficult to see due to the smoke and haze from the wildfires in the Pacific Northwest. This haze kept the contrast low on our horizon and in the mountains. There was also a thick cloud bank off to the west which concerned me. We may not even see a sunset. But I made my peace with it and headed out to the gorge anyways.

When we arrived to the bridge the sun was in between cloud cover which gave me a little more hope of capturing my "hero" shot. After some scouting, I found my composition and set up my tripod and staked my claim of the observation platform. I sat there shooting photos and turning around to check for approaching vehicles. Between the cars and the wind I was able to shoot off several bracketed exposures of the same composition. Finally, the sun became low on the horizon and just above the cloud deck to the west. This was the time to capture as close to the shot I had envisioned. The light just kissed the top of the gorge and the canyon wall and while it wasn't the crazy dramatic light I was hoping for, it was still a remarkable scene. Perhaps the best thing was the patches of clouds that absorbed all the color from sunset giving the sky some nice texture. In fact, there is so much texture in this shot. You have the texture of the river, texture of the gorge, texture in the mountains, and texture in the clouds. This gives this image great depth and dimension. It is without a doubt, my "hero" shot from this trip to New Mexico and I'm very happy with how the final image came out. I have many more NM photos coming soon! 

 

Susnet on the Rio Grande Gorge © Ben Jacobi

 


Pic of the Week 8/31/17 "New Mexico: Land of Enchantment"

August 31, 2017  •  Leave a Comment

Pic of the Week 8/31/17

"New Mexico: Land of Enchantment"

Date Taken: 8/12/17

Location: San Jon, NM

 

Just like last week's Pic of the Week we are in New Mexico for this week. In fact, we are even on the same day. I'll just go ahead and say that 8/12/17 was an excellent photography outing. I met up with my good friend Jim Livingston at his home in Amarillo. We were going to be driving into eastern New Mexico in hopes of clear skies for the Perseids meteor shower. Around 6pm we left Jim's house and drove west on I-40 towards New Mexico. Along the way we could see isolated thunderstorms building in the hot summer air. Earlier that afternoon I had driven through 40 miles of precip so I was a little discouraged when I saw the storms building. After all, our plan was to shoot the meteor shower, a task which can be very challenging under cloudy skies.

But as we continued driving we watched as the storm began to gain strength and evolve into a massive billowing updraft. The storm itself was photogenic, but there wasn't much of a foreground interest to shoot the scene. We continued west on 40 keeping an eye on the storm. We were just a few miles outside of San Jon, NM when the Caprock Escarpment came into view. Now this would serve as an excellent foreground to the storm! We turned south out of San Jon and headed towards the caprock. Bursts of sunlight were sneaking through the clouds and lighting up isolated areas of the landscape. We couldn't wait any longer and at the first good available road we pulled up and quickly got our gear out and started shooting.

We watched as the storm brewed and churned over the caprock taking on some amazing shapes and contrast. For a few hours we sat there watching the storm and shooting still as well as timelapse images. When sunset rolled around the show really began! The storm clouds became very contrasty, some soaking up the golden sunset light and some falling into the dark shadows and core of the thunderstorm. The light was near perfect shining just slightly on the caprock in front of us highlighting the interesting parts of the caprock and reflecting some of the windmills on the top. As I was shooting, the sun reached the perfect angle to light up a rain shaft and revealed a small, but photogenic rainbow. I pulled out my Tamron 70-200mm f/2.8 lens and zoomed in on the scene. The telephoto lens compresses and brings everything in the photo tight together making the storm appear closer. This also brought the windmills up larger in the frame helping to establish a sense of scale in the scene.

I shot about 10 frames during this time before the light and rainbow vanished. It didn't last but for a few moments, but it was excellent. All you could hear was the clicks of our shutters and the gasps of our excitation. It was truly an enchanting scene. As the storm progressed further northeast it started to lose its organization and quickly dried up. New towers started to go up along the outflow of the previous thunderstorm. The light had all but disappeared except for the tops of the storm and we stayed and watched until all the light was gone. 

The New Mexico state slogan is "New Mexico: Land of Enchantment" and I couldn't think of a more appropriate title for the images I captured that evening. We continued on through the night shooting the fantastic night sky counting meteors that zipped overhead and hoping they were in our shots. It was an amazing impromptu trip that resulted in some of my favorite photos I've shot this whole year. 

 

Monsoon thunderstorm rolls in over the Caprock Escarpment south of San Jon, NM. © Ben Jacobi

 

 

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